Hyperion (Greek Ὑπερίων, “The High-One”) was one of the twelve Titans of Ancient Greece, the sons and daughters of Gaia (the physical incarnation of Earth) and Ouranos (literally meaning ‘the Sky’), which were later supplanted by the Olympians. He was the brother of Cronus. He was also the lord of light, and the Titan of the east. He was referred to in early mythological writings as Helios Hyperion (Ἥλιος Ὑπερίων), ‘Sun High-one’. But in Homer’s Odyssey, Hesiod’s Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, the Sun is once in each work called Hyperionides (Ὑπεριωνιδής) ‘son of Hyperion’, and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate being in other writings.

Hyperion (Greek Ὑπερίων, “The High-One”) was one of the twelve Titans of Ancient Greece, the sons and daughters of Gaia (the physical incarnation of Earth) and Ouranos (literally meaning ‘the Sky’), which were later supplanted by the Olympians. He was the brother of Cronus. He was also the lord of light, and the Titan of the east. He was referred to in early mythological writings as Helios Hyperion (Ἥλιος Ὑπερίων), ‘Sun High-one’. But in Homer’s Odyssey, Hesiod’s Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, the Sun is once in each work called Hyperionides (Ὑπεριωνιδής) ‘son of Hyperion’, and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate being in other writings.